Climber discovers ancient relic in Italy that is now worth over $80,000

Italian climber Daniel Cesarini is in the headlines after he recently discovered a 1,750-year-old necklace bearing Egyptian hieroglyphs that are worth a whopping €80,000 ($84,000). Cesarini, a certified environmentalist who has previously worked for…

Climber discovers ancient relic in Italy that is now worth over $80,000

Italian climber Daniel Cesarini is in the headlines after he recently discovered a 1,750-year-old necklace bearing Egyptian hieroglyphs that are worth a whopping €80,000 ($84,000).

Cesarini, a certified environmentalist who has previously worked for the Italian Ministry of Environment and Environmen, was walking on Mont Blanc at high altitude on a sabbatical from his job when he came across the skeleton of a headless, partially naked figure, covered in beads, having been cut from a nest of about 10 eggs.

He checked his watch and realized it was just 5.8 miles away.

“I walked there taking a whole day off, and I decided to go to look at the bones,” he told the Times. “I passed through a forest, but then I saw a piece of white cloth, an unknown piece of cloth, and I could say ‘wow, that looks quite well preserved.’”

Cesarini then discovered a set of half necklaces that were on display in a museum, containing grooves showing the characters from the Egyptian hieroglyphic alphabet.

“It was too tempting not to have checked the market for the value of the pieces,” he said. “I didn’t have any special skills. I knew about jewellery from a book I had earlier read, but I was still amazed by what I saw.”

He could not see how the necklaces were made, though, and decided not to pass them on.

“There was always this feeling that at some time the lost treasure would come back to us in its original form,” he said. “But all these years, I felt that the inscription was something that only remained in a certain context, it was something that would remain in the museum.”

The finder donated his finds to a research institute in Vittone where they have been on show in a small room since October 1.

Read the full story at The Times.

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