A primer on cheeses from around the world

Written by by Staff Writer, Guest Contributor Cheese is a staple of European food culture, from cheese curds and cheesesteaks to cheddar and camembert. Whether ready to be fried or grilled, pressed, aged or…

A primer on cheeses from around the world

Written by by Staff Writer, Guest Contributor

Cheese is a staple of European food culture, from cheese curds and cheesesteaks to cheddar and camembert. Whether ready to be fried or grilled, pressed, aged or in a sachet, cheeses sit along the food chain from industrial factories and grain farms all the way down to cheese shops and homemade cheeses.

Volkswagen Soul ➡️ Quality Lamborghini set up to market the VW brand again. “It is an exciting opportunity to be part of a huge cross-branding project,” explains an incoming source. Volkswagen Sport car rep: ‘We don’t currently make a product that the people in this country, and especially the millennials, want.’ Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/national/en/news/24741473/VW-retails-plate-dreir.html

Fortunately, we all have the luxury of home cooking.

To help give you an insight into how some of Europe’s tastiest cheeses are prepared, we’ve put together a selection of cheeses, listed according to country of origin and age. We’ve also included the recommended age of the type of cheese and other information to give you the best ideas on where to try and what to expect.

Australia

Cheese tortellini with cream cheese. Source: Alexandra

The first thing to know about Australia’s cheeses is that they’re not made.

In 2015, parliament voted to repeal the nation’s cheese-making laws, citing that they had cost the Australian economy billions of dollars a year in lost sales.

The laws, pushed through in 1929, prohibited cheese manufacturing in Australia.

Now, the domestic industry has lobbied for the laws to be reinstated and, in April 2018, they were approved.

The move came after the Dairy Federation of Australia produced a report, arguing that new laws would boost trade by 60% and provide an income boost to a $15 billion industry.

The majority of Australia’s cheeses come from milk transported by air and railway from New Zealand and Argentina. After “hauling away” their produce, cheese makers incorporate it in their homemade products, which include homemade chutneys, aged gouda, aged gruyere and butter mousse.

Leave a Comment